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Work starts on iconic York crescent

Work is now underway on one of the North’s most anticipated residential developments, which will see the iconic St Leonard’s Place Grade II* crescent in York restored into grand town houses, apartments and mews properties.

Hall Construction, a family-run Yorkshire-based multi-skilled contractor, with over 130 years of heritage, has been appointed to carry out the construction work on behalf of Rushbond, the owners and developers of one of the City’s most recognisable set of landmark buildings.

Built as the pinnacle of grand living in the 19th century, the residential-led scheme will see the crescent converted into five grand town houses and 29 apartments, along with the development of six new mews properties.

Mark Finch, director of Real Estate at Rushbond, which has a long-established track record in the region for restoring fine listed buildings, said: “Our plans are to restore and transform St Leonard’s Place once again back into one of the North’s most prestigious addresses.

“The street was built in the 1830’s to effectively replicate what was being achieved in London at that time, and it’s a great privilege to have the opportunity to return the crescent back to its original use.

“We have worked closely with a whole host of local people to ensure that these most-cherished buildings will be restored to their former glory.

“We have been so pleased with the support we have received from various quarters so far, and we very much look forward to playing our part in reinstating the pride back into these important assets.”

Simon North, group operations director of Hall Construction, said: “Our firm is the legacy of previous generations of contractors, founded in the 19th century.

“It is an absolute privilege to be working on restoring a building from that era and our team are very enthusiastic about applying their skills to deliver a wonderful array of residential properties for the benefit of future generations.

“We envisage that over 100 people will be employed across the site, and through our local supply chain, we hope to create some significant economic benefits for the City.”

Mark Finch added: “It is an important restoration project and we have been through a painstaking process in order to select the right partner to deliver it.

“We have been hugely impressed by the enthusiasm, commitment and track record of Hall Construction who share the same values over the need for a sensitive restoration scheme which demands the care and attention of true craftspeople.

“This whole area of the City is undergoing a huge renaissance and with the restoration of the Theatre Royal, the new works at the York Art Gallery and the recently completed York Explore Library, there is a huge commitment to the architectural and historic legacy of this part of the City.

“It is truly a transformation programme brought about by the energies of a whole host of people, and we are pleased that we are able to play our part in this renaissance.

“We will be working closely with our neighbours to ensure that any disruption is reduced to a minimum level during the works, but there will inevitably be some impact, particularly around Library Square, and we will work closely with the authorities to ensure that this is carefully managed.”

Tanya Coffey of Savills, York, the firm appointed as marketing agents for the development, said: “St Leonard’s Place brought a style of living to the North in the 19th century that had previously only been reserved for London.

“It is an incredibly exciting prospect to once again offer a variety of new homes of this stature to the market and for local, regional, national and indeed international buyers to have a chance of being part of something very special.” 

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Mark Finch, director of Real Estate at Rushbond, and Simon North, group operations director of Hall Construction on site at St Leonard’s Place, York

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